Introducing Nobody’s Child – Fast Fashion with a Conscience

Introducing Nobody’s Child – Fast Fashion with a Conscience

 

Welcome to the very first entry on the Nobody’s Child magazine. Exciting times! Today we want to take the opportunity to introduce our range of ethically manufactured tops, skirts and dresses, and explain what we mean by ‘fast fashion with a conscience.’ But as they say, you only get one chance to make a first impression, so here goes...

 

three girls wearing nobody's child white tops

 
 

Introducing Nobody’s Child

 

Like you, we absolutely love fashion. And when we see something we like, we want it there and then. No hanging around. #YOLO right? That said, fast fashion has been known to come with a price, and we don’t mean the one after the pound sign. Thousands of people around the world are forced to work in less than satisfactory conditions, but it doesn’t need to be this way!! And Nobody’s Child is proof of that.

 

woman wearing nobody's child floral print wrap dressFloral Wrap Dress – £28

 
 

Fast Fashion with a Conscience

 

‘Fast fashion with a conscience’ is how we describe it, and our goal is simple; to deliver the most on-trend and current pieces, at the lowest possible prices, without sacrificing quality, or compromising our ethical standards. In fact, don’t take just take our word for it – check out our latest collection of crop tops, bodysuits and bodycon dresses here.

 

girl wearing nobody's child palm leaf print bomber jacketPalm Print Bomber – £25

 
 

Ethical Manufacturing

 

You see, Nobody’s Child either owns or has complete control over the entire supply chain. Put simply, we ensure that every stage of the fashion manufacturing process is ethically managed, and because we manufacture our own clothing, we’ve also cut out the middle man, meaning we can produce high quality clothing at a price you’re happy to pay.

 

lady wearing nobody's child black bodycon dress with mesh Black Bodycon Dress – £30

 

To read more about how we’ve achieved ‘fast fashion with a conscience’, check out our ‘about us’ section, but before you do, why not give us little follow on Instagram @NobodysChild, to ensure you’re always in the know about the latest fashion and style updates…

 
 

Comments
  1. Alice Hunt

    Hi, this sounds like a great business idea, I did a lot of social research for my dissertation regarding ethical clothing and found out how difficult it is to balance quality, affordability and ethics. I was just wondering out of interest how and what you do to maintain ethical standards within the supply chain of your clothes?

    It’s really exciting to have a clothes brand marketing ethics as a stronghold and would be amazing if this was the way forward.

    I look forward to hearing a reply from you,

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Nobody's Child

      Thanks so much for your comments, Alice. It’s great to see people as passionate about ethical fashion as we are. To answer your question, we are a vertically integrated manufacturer who, following ten years of development, owns the majority of its supply chain. We knit, we dye, we produce and we distribute. By having full control of our supply base, this allows us to monitor and comply with our ethical obligations. If you have any further questions, please email Nicky.mcshane@nobodyschild.com who will be pleased to answer them. X

      Reply
  2. Helen

    Hello, can you tell me why your ads are photographs of very young (possibly pre-pubescent) girls in provocative poses?
    It gives an impression that these children are sexy or even sexually available.
    I find these ads deeply offensive and potentially damaging to many young girls. Please, please THINK ABOUT IT !

    Reply
    • Nobody's Child

      Hi Helen. Thank you for sharing your views, but we are pleased to confirm that none of our models are under 18. In fact, our main model is in her twenties. As for the style of our shots, they are targeted towards a fashion demographic and are not intentionally provocative. Best, NC

      Reply
  3. Helen

    The assertion that the shots are not “intentionally provocative” shouldn’t allow your business to feel it doesn’t have any responsibility for the way women are portrayed in your adverts.
    Regards

    Reply

Join the convo...

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *