Four-Fave-Fits: Meet The Dresses that are ALWAYS in!

Four-Fave-Fits: Meet The Dresses that are ALWAYS in!

 
 

Valentine’s Day might be round the corner, but these four dresses 100% do not date. As for new season, they really couldn’t care less. Cos whether it’s SS17, the summer of 69, or that winter John Snow keeps banging on about, they’re ALWAYS in. Age-proof, season-resistant, time-defying… meet the four-fave-fits you can rely on 24/7, 365/foreverrrrrrrrrr.

 
 

The Mini Dress

 

Rising to fame during the swinging sixties, legend goes that a shop on Oxford Street began experimenting with shorter hemlines, and just like that, the trend exploded. Since then, the mini dress hasn’t really taken any time off, and thank god! It’s a date-night no-brainer (wink, wink, nudge, nudge… VALENTINE’S DAY!), but can totally do the whole 9-5 thing, too.

 

Taking on a slightly more relaxed shape this season, try it over a tee with a pair of doc-m’s for a grunge-meets-glam vibe!

 

girls wearing nobody's child blue and conker satin ruffle minidressesConker Satin Mini Dress – £25

 

Most famous moment – Geri Halliwell, Brit Awards, 1997. And just like that, Cub Scouts the country-over were never able to salute their beloved Union Jack in the same way again.

 
 

The Slip Dress

 

Think slip dress. Think nineties. Think Kate Moss. As minimal as it gets, the stripped back style totally contradicted the highly-stylised look of the previous decade. Basically a petticoat in disguise, it was not only a departure but an act of rebellion, and became hugely popular as part of the underwear-as-outerwear movement.

 

Though still a totes laidback option, SS17 sees the slip dress take on fresh floral patterns in time for spring. After an urban-edge? Throw an oversized slogan sweat over-top and keep things casj in sneakers.

 

girl wearing nobody's child floral slip dress and black roll neck topNavy Floral Slip Dress – £25

 

Most famous moment – The year’s 1993 and Kate Moss (who else?) wears a completely see-thru slip to the Elite Model’s Party in London. With absolutely nowt on underneath, save a barely-there pair o’ knickers, just imagine the… ahem… exposure it created.

 
 

The Tea Dress

 

Carry a Polaroid and think everything sounds better on vinyl? This one’s for you. Typically associated with the consumption of a certain hot beverage (no prizes for guessing which), the concept of a tea dress started way back during the early 1800s, when there was nothing more civilised and class-confirming than the thought of an afternoon spot of refreshment. The style slowly developed over the next hundred years, but has remained pretty-much unchanged since the fifties… which is no doubt why it’s such a fave among retro-enthusiasts!

 

girls wearing nobody's child red and blue button-up tea dressesOrange Button-Through Tea Dress – £22

 

Most famous moment – A dress devised purely for the afternoon drinking of tea isn’t exactly gonna’ have much in the way of rock n’ roll moments. But then again, there was that time Kurt Cobain performed in one…

 
 

The Wrap Dress

 

Arguable the oldest style here, this season’s wrap dress has been largely based on the traditional Japanese kimono what with its oversized sleeves and cross-over shape. Such a design dates back to the Heian Period (794–1192 AD… cheers, Wikipedia), while the word ‘kimono’ literally translates in English as ‘thing to wear.’ Though conventionally worn with sandals and a pair of split toe socks, we’re kinda’ liking ours with your classic cons RN.

 

girl wearing nobody's child floral wrap dress and choker necklaceDaisy Print Wrap Dress – £30

 

Most famous moment – Lucy Lui as the samurai-wielding assassin, O-Ren Ishii, in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill. It’s a look to die for, believe us.

 

So, the mini, the wrap, the slip and the tea dress… Let us know which one of our ‘four-fave-fits’ gets your vote this season, and why not show us how you’re styling it over on Instagram using #NCrowd.

 
 

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